Harriet Harman

Member of Parliament for Camberwell and Peckham. Mother of the House.

Current News

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Out with the Faraday Labour team and local councillor Lorraine Lauder talking to residents on the Taplow Estate and East Street market today!

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Visiting Taplow Estate and East Street Market

Out with the Faraday Labour team and local councillor Lorraine Lauder talking to residents on the Taplow Estate and East Street market today!    

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Busy school gate campaigning Michael Faraday Primary with Faraday Labour Councillors Paul Fleming, Samantha Jury-Dada and Lorraine Lauder this morning. The school was rebuilt under the last Labour Government. 

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Campaigning at Michael Faraday Primary School

Busy school gate campaigning Michael Faraday Primary with Faraday Labour Councillors Paul Fleming, Samantha Jury-Dada and Lorraine Lauder this morning. The school was rebuilt under the last Labour Government. 

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Busy Ilderton school gate this morning with parents, Councillor Evelyn Akoto and Councillor Richard Livingstone. 

Meeting parents at Ilderton Primary School

Busy Ilderton school gate this morning with parents, Councillor Evelyn Akoto and Councillor Richard Livingstone. 

Crawford_3_25.4.2017.JPGSpeaking to parents at Crawford Primary School in Camberwell this morning with local councillor at Kieron Williams. Clear that the great progress for children at Crawford is being threatened by Tory cuts. 

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Crawford Primary School campaigning

Speaking to parents at Crawford Primary School in Camberwell this morning with local councillor at Kieron Williams. Clear that the great progress for children at Crawford is being threatened by...

SE5_Forum_photo_3.jpgHelen Hayes MP, SE5 Forum, Camberwell Green councillor Kieron Williams and I have been working together to campaign to re-open Camberwell Station which sits on the Thameslink Line and is located on Camberwell Station Road. 

This would come as welcome relief to people in Southwark, who have suffered from poor transport links for years, especially following the disappoint of the proposal for the Bakerloo Line extension to only serve Old Kent Rent and with the ongoing Southern Rail chaos.

Helen Hayes MP and I have written to the Secretary of State for Transport Chris Grayling MP to request an urgent meeting to call on the Government to re-open the station.

Find out how you can get involved in the campaign at www.openourstation.uk and sign the e-petition herewww.change.org/p/department-for-transport-re-open-camberwell-railway-station-london-se5

On Twitter you can follow the campaign using the hashtag #CamberwellStation and the campaign Twitter account @OpenOurStation

 

 

 

 

 

 

Campaigning to re-open Camberwell Station

Helen Hayes MP, SE5 Forum, Camberwell Green councillor Kieron Williams and I have been working together to campaign to re-open Camberwell Station which sits on the Thameslink Line and is... Read more

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Speaking to residents about local issues at Peckham Rye Station this morning - thanks to Southwark Labour members for joining me.

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Peckham Rye Station Campaigning

Speaking to residents about local issues at Peckham Rye Station this morning - thanks to Southwark Labour members for joining me.  

Capture.JPGGreat to meet residents on the Friary Estate this morning and listen to local concerns with Livesey ward Councillor Richard Livingstone and Labour members.

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Friary Estate Walkabout

Great to meet residents on the Friary Estate this morning and listen to local concerns with Livesey ward Councillor Richard Livingstone and Labour members.

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Good to talk to parents, children and headteacher Manda George about local issues at Rye Oak Primary this morning with local Lane Councillor Jasmine Ali. Staff at Rye Oak Primary have been doing great work but Government cuts of £1,000 per pupil funding mean they've already had to cut support staff & increase class sizes to thirty plus. Labour will oppose school cuts all the way.

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Rye Oak Primary School visit

Good to talk to parents, children and headteacher Manda George about local issues at Rye Oak Primary this morning with local Lane Councillor Jasmine Ali. Staff at Rye Oak Primary...

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Parliamentary Report - March/April 2017

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IMG_0327.JPGGreat to talk to local parents, children and headteachers Gregory Doey and Julie Ireland at Pilgrims' Way Primary School this morning with the Government's cuts to education are now threatening that progress - Pilgrims' Way is facing a £1,110 cut in per pupil funding from 2015-20. I will continue to support the Southwark Parents Against Cuts to Education group and work my Labour colleagues to fight these cuts all the way.

Pilgrim's Way Primary School Visit

Great to talk to local parents, children and headteachers Gregory Doey and Julie Ireland at Pilgrims' Way Primary School this morning with the Government's cuts to education are now threatening that...

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Legislation and enforcement need to be improved to ensure adequate protection of workers' human rights, a new report published today by the Joint Committee on Human Rights has found. The report proposes providing more accessible and effective mechanisms to improve access to justice in cases where human rights may have been breached. 

Stronger Legislation

  • The National Action Plan is the UK's statement of intent on human rights - it must be more ambitious and set specific targets by which to measure progress
  • The Government should introduce legislation to impose a duty on all companies to prevent human rights abuses, as well as a criminal offence of 'failure to prevent human rights abuses' similar to offences created for bribery in the Bribery Act 2010
  • The Government should introduce legislation to enable prosecution of a parent company where human rights abuses are found further down the supply chain
  • The Government's proposed 'Great Repeal Bill' must replicate the human rights protections enshrined in EU law
  • The Government should support the proposals contained within the Modern Slavery (Transparency in Supply Chains) Bill (requiring commercial businesses and public bodies to include a statement on slavery and human trafficking in their annual report and accounts)
  • Human rights must be a key component of future trade deals

Stronger Enforcement

  • The Government should extend protections provided by the Gangmasters & Labour Abuse Authority to other industries, such as construction
  • Government procurement must lead by example and exclude companies who do not undertake appropriate due diligence to ensure human rights standards are met
  • The Government should give local authorities the powers to close down business premises found to exploit workers (e.g. where there has been found to be underpayment of wages, lack of employment contracts or where there is a significant disregard of health and safety regulations)

Clearer Routes to Justice

  • The UK National Contact Point (NCP) must be given the resources and government support to be an effective route to justice
  • Tribunal fees must be reduced to remove the disincentive for individuals to bring legitimate claims for discrimination and other abuses

Chair's comment

On publishing the report, Chair of the Committee, Rt Hon Harriet Harman MP commented:

"No one wants to be wearing clothes made by child labour, or slave labour. UK companies need to have high standards abroad as well as here at home and they must ensure that there are not human rights abuses in their supply chain.

More can be done by the UK Government to ensure that human rights are respected by UK companies in their operations outside the UK. The Government must toughen up the law with a new legal duty on businesses to respect human rights when they are operating abroad. Victims of human rights abuses must have access to the courts. And the Government should ensure that when it buys on our behalf it doesn't do so from suppliers who are abusing human rights.

Over the course of this inquiry we were pleased to hear of the growing importance of human rights issues to businesses, consumers and government. Indeed, developments such as the Gangmasters Licencing Authority and Modern Slavery Act have caused real improvements. Yet, all too often, cases were brought to our attention where people were making the products we use every day in conditions that are simply not acceptable. In the UK, this can mean pay below the minimum wage and dangerous working conditions; in other countries it can mean virtual slavery and long-term damage to the natural environment.

The UK must build on work already done and create human rights protections that demand high standards of businesses. Businesses must be required by law to demonstrate how they are ensuring human rights are respected in their operations - if they do not then public bodies must exclude them from procurement opportunities.

Access to justice must be improved and companies must feel the effects of their actions. We would like to see laws enacted to allow victims to bring claims against companies where they have failed to prevent human rights harms from occurring.

Article 50 has been triggered. We are removing ourselves from the oversight of EU law and looking to develop new trading opportunities around the world. Human rights protections must not be lost in the rush. The 'Repeal Bill' must replicate human rights currently protected by EU law. Human rights protections must be a central pillar of future trade deals. If the conditions under which the things we buy are considered unacceptable in the UK then we must not simply export the problem to another country.

We have to make sure that when human rights abuses occur they are uncovered. Routes to access justice must be understood and achievable for those affected. The UK National Contact Point must become the advocate of human rights it is intended to be and the Government must give them the support they need to do this. The Government must further enable victims to seek justice. Excessive charges for access to a tribunal is an often insurmountable barrier. We are talking about exploited workers entering a complex system for the first time. They need support, not charges that they cannot afford to pay."

Case study: Textiles production in Turkey and the UK

A key finding in the report is the importance and difficulty in enforcing best practice throughout supply chains. Major high street retailers will regularly outsource the production of their fashion lines to factories, who may then further subcontract production elsewhere.

Over the course of the inquiry, the Committee spoke to major high street retailers and visited factories in Turkey and Leicester.

The emergence of "fast fashion", where styles seen on the catwalk are available cheaply in shops in a matter of weeks, has shifted production back to the UK where suppliers are able to offer quicker turnaround times than competitors thousands of miles away. Research by the University of Leicester has indicated that this new sub-industry is characterised by frequent violations of work and employment regulations.

"The majority of garment workers are paid way below the National Minimum Wage, do not have employment contracts, and are subject to intense and arbitrary work practices."

Centre for Sustainable Work and Employment Futures, University of Leicester

"What the employers do is that they make her sign a paper that she will work either 16 or 20 hours a week at minimum wage. Then they will give her a draft copy of wage slip which will again show that she works for example 20 hours and is paid £7.20 an hour...She worked on average 60 hours a week but only got paid £3 sometimes £3.50 an hour. In that time she also suffered severe back pain because of the number of hours she worked. She was always paid cash."

Written evidence received by JCHR from Ms Sarita Shah

In their evidence to the Committee, major retailers including ASOS, M&S and NEXT placed human rights issues high up their agenda, and noted the increased importance of ethical production to consumers. In many instances, sub-contracting has been explicitly prohibited in contracts and retailers have taken remedial action to improve conditions. However, supply chain dynamics, and the uneven distribution of costs and benefits between retailers and manufacturers cannot be discounted as a major factor. According to local manufacturers in the UK, buyers did not understand the real costs of production and often compared costs to those available overseas. A skewed playing field had been created whereby profit margins for suppliers were so small they left no room for improved wages or working conditions.

Harriet Harman commented:

"When high street retailers spoke to the Committee they told us that maintaining human rights in their supply chain was high up on their agenda, and it is becoming more important to consumers as well. However, serious concerns remain about the lack of speed and ineffectiveness of the action that some companies take when problems emerge. We must guard against any negative impact of the demand for quick, cheap fashion. The buck has to stop with businesses: they must demand that their suppliers pay good wages and have safe working conditions."

Further information

Image: iStockphoto

Government needs to step in to protect workers' human rights

Legislation and enforcement need to be improved to ensure adequate protection of workers' human rights, a new report published today by the Joint Committee on Human Rights has found. The report... Read more

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Today, along with my parliamentary team, I attended the Service of Hope at Westminster Abbey. The service brought together people of all faiths in Commemoration of those who died or were injured in the attack on the 22nd March, it also gave recognition to the voluntary agencies who gave their support to all those involved.

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Service of Hope at Westminster Abbey

Today, along with my parliamentary team, I attended the Service of Hope at Westminster Abbey. The service brought together people of all faiths in Commemoration of those who died or were...

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Today I visited the great team at Kings College Hospital to say thank you for their amazing care of those caught in the Westminster attack on March 22nd. Nick Moberly, Chief Executive of Kings College Hospital Trust hosted the meeting and we were also joined by Helen Hayes MP for Dulwich & West Norwood.

 

It was a privilege to meet and hear from the team on duty that day:

Mr Robert Bentley, Clinical Director of Trauma and Emergency Surgery

Dr Shelley Dolan, Chief Nurse and Executive Director of Midwifery

Jennifer Watson, Director of Nursing

Mick Dowling, Head of Nursing, Critical Care

Frankie Northfield, Head of Physiotherapy

Kevin Dennison, Head of Nursing, Planned Surgery and Ophthalmology

Sister Isabella Jewel, Ward Sister, Katherine Monk Ward

Dr Sean Cross, Consultant Liaison Psychiatrist

Harvey McEnroe, Deputy Chief Operating Officer, Network Care and Silver Command during the incident

Malcolm Tunnicliff, Clinical Director, Emergency Medicine

Jacqui Sahiri & Tracey MacCormack from the Midwifery team. With the lock down of St Thomas’, King’s received their expectant mothers.

Nicola Torrens, Pharmacy Team Leader in A&E

Anna Oviedova, Neurosurgery Registrar

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Visit to Kings College Hospital following the Westminster attack

Today I visited the great team at Kings College Hospital to say thank you for their amazing care of those caught in the Westminster attack on March 22nd. Nick Moberly,...

Simon_Messinger_Flo_Eshalomi_28.3.2017.jpgThis morning Florence Eshalomi AM and I met Southwark Borough Commander Simon Messinger to discuss the Met's proposal to merge Southwark and Lambeth for policing, as part of a wider proposal to reduce borough commanders in the capital from 32 to 12. We expressed our concern about the impact of this on the relationship between Southwark police, and the local community and council, and will continue to oppose these proposals.  

Met plan to merge Southwark and Lambeth for policing

This morning Florence Eshalomi AM and I met Southwark Borough Commander Simon Messinger to discuss the Met's proposal to merge Southwark and Lambeth for policing, as part of a wider...

St_Georges_Primary_School_1_USE_28.3.17.jpgGreat to meet parents and children from St George's Primary School this morning, as well as the new Headteacher Stephen Scott. He and his team are doing good work in taking the school forward but they have a very difficult job to do with the Tory cuts to per pupil funding of £875 by 2020. We'll be working together to oppose the Government's school cuts.

St George's Primary School Visit

Great to meet parents and children from St George's Primary School this morning, as well as the new Headteacher Stephen Scott. He and his team are doing good work in taking...

HH_speech_-_Westminster_terror_attack_23.3.17.jpgI want to thank the Prime Minister for her words here today and also her words on the steps of Downing Street yesterday. At this very difficult and important time she spoke for us all, so I thank her for that. We’re so proud of the bravery of PC Keith Palmer. So sad for his grieving family. But so grateful for what he did to keep us safe, and I’d like to add my tribute to all the police here in Westminster and the parliamentary staff, who acted with such calmness and professionalism yesterday, and I’d like to pay tribute too, to the emergency trauma team at King’s College Hospital, who are caring for the injured.

This was a horrific crime, and it has cost lives and caused injury, but as an act of terror it has failed. It has failed because we are here and we are going to go about our business. It’s failed because despite the trauma that they witnessed outside their windows our staff are here, and they are getting on with their work. It failed because as the Prime Minister so rightly said we are not going to allow this to be used as a pretext for division, hatred and Islamophobia.

This democracy is strong and this Parliament is robust. This was a horrific crime, but as an act of terror it has failed.

Westminster Attack - Statement in the House of Commons

I want to thank the Prime Minister for her words here today and also her words on the steps of Downing Street yesterday. At this very difficult and important time...

image1.JPGToday in the House of Commons I asked the Education Secretary Justine Greening MP to protect Southwark schools from the cuts in her so-called fair funding formula.

Thanks to increased investment and the work of teachers, other teaching staff, supportive parents and the local community, standards in our schools in Southwark have massively increased, but our schools are not overfunded. Surely it cannot be right that, per pupil, we will see a cut of £1,000 per year as a result of this so-called fair funding formula. It is not fair. Whatever levelling up the Secretary of State needs to do in other parts of the country, she should please go ahead and do so, but do not cut schools funding for the poorest children.

You can read the full debate online in Hansard.

Question to Education Secretary challenging cuts to Southwark schools

Today in the House of Commons I asked the Education Secretary Justine Greening MP to protect Southwark schools from the cuts in her so-called fair funding formula. Thanks to increased...

Prison_officers_and_self-inflicted_deaths_(public_sector)_portrait.jpgAs prison officers are cut, prison suicides soar. Today I spoke in the Second Reading of the Prison and Courts Bill in the House of Commons to call for a new law that sets out a maximum ratio of prisoners to officers. This is the full text of my speech:

This Bill gives the House, the Secretary of State and her Prisons Minister the chance to do something which should have been done a long time ago - but which is now urgent.  And that is to end the death toll of suicidal mentally ill people who take their own lives in our prisons.

When the state takes someone into custody we have a duty to keep them safe.  Their life becomes our responsibility.  Yet prisons are not a place of safety.  Last year 12 women and 107 men took their own lives while in prisons, in the custody of the state.

The Bill this Government has brought forward affords us the important opportunity to change the law to prevent these tragic deaths and we must seize that opportunity because the problem is urgent and it is growing.

We all know that the issue of prison reform is not one which brings people out onto the streets, or which tops the agenda at election time. And unfortunately I wish I could agree with the honourable member who has just spoken, much of which I did agree with him on, but actually I think that when it does rise up the agenda it is usually not in the cause of liberalising prison regimes but because of demands to make them more draconian.  That makes the job of Secretary of State and the Prisons Minister - in any government - particularly challenging. Which is why, where it's possible, a cross-party approach to this is important and why the Committee which I have the honour to chair, the Joint Committee on Human Rights, which is both cross-party and comprised of members from both this House and the House of Lords, is conducting an inquiry into suicides in prison.  

Every single one of these deaths is an absolute tragedy for each individual and their family.

As Mark, the father of Dean who took his own life told our Committee earlier this month, "we don't have capital punishment in this country. Yet when Dean was sent to Chelmsford Prison he was sentenced to death."

And so too it was for Diane Waplington, whose mother and aunt came to Parliament to give evidence to our Committee.  Her suffering had been so intense that to harm herself she set fire to a mattress while in a secure hospital and the response was to send her to Peterborough prison, where she took her own life.

The tragedy of suicide in prison is not new but, as the Government acknowledges, it is urgent.  Last year the number of self-inflicted deaths rose by 32%.

It's not that this is a new problem, or even one where no-one knows what to do.  There have, over the years, been numerous weighty reports which Members of this House, members of the House of Lords, judges and many others have contributed to which have analysed the problems and mapped out the solutions.

Successive governments have welcomed their proposals, changed policy, issued new guidelines - but nothing changes.  Except the death toll - which rises.

*In 1991 we had the Woolf Report.

*In 2007 The Corston Report.

*In 2009 The Bradley Report.

*In 2015 The Harris Report.

It's not that we don't know what needs to be done - it’s just that we haven't done it.

We must recognise the reality here.  There is no point in having more reviews or new policies or new guidance.

What is needed is to make sure the changes we all know are needed actually happen in practice.  And for that to happen what is needed is a legal framework which will ensure that the necessary changes take place because they are required by statute. 

Reports and guidance and White Papers are not enforceable and are not enforced.  Law is.  This Bill is the opportunity to put into law the changes, highlighted by the countless, weighty reviews and inquiries. 

The Joint Committee on Human Rights' inquiry is still ongoing.  But because this Bill is before the House now, I want to ask the Prisons Minister to consider including a number of New Clauses in this Bill in order to put into law the following: 

  • Firstly there should be a legal maximum for the number of prisoners per prison officer. 

When there are not enough staff - sometimes just two prison officers on a wing of 150 prisoners - prisoners remain locked in their cell, medical appointments and educational sessions are missed, they don't get to see the nurse for their medication, calls for help go unanswered.  Prison officers don't have the time to unlock them for exercise, let alone sit down and get to know the prisoners and, in the vacuum, the worst of the prisoners take charge.  Staff become demoralised and defensive, prisoners angry and frightened - the most vulnerable at risk. 

You can either cut the number of people going to prison or you can increase the number of prison officers. But what the Government has been doing is cutting the number of prison officers while the number of prisoners has increased. You can see a clear correlation between the falling number of prison officers and the rising number of prison suicides and I've put the graph on a tweet just now which shows it very clearly. Unless the prisoner/prison officer ratio changes, the death toll will continue to rise.  We have got the opportunity to put into this Bill a legal maximum prisoner/prison officer ratio. 

  • Secondly a legal maximum time a prisoner can be kept in their cell.  
     
    The Government agree that there should be a maximum time for prisoners to be locked in their cells.  It was in their response to the Harris Review, it's in their White Paper. But it doesn't happen.  A legal obligation is required to make sure it does. 

  • A legal obligation for the Prison Service to ensure that each young prisoner or adult prisoner with mental health problems has a keyworker - whether it’s a prison officer or someone else, what matters is that there's an individual who takes responsibility to bring together all the information from the different services inside and outside the prison and, crucially, someone to liaise with the family. 

This is in the White Paper, but I say to the Minister, that unless it's in the Bill, it just won’t happen - it'll remain nothing more than a good intention.

  • Next, unless there is a specified reason that it shouldn't be the case, the relatives of a suicidal prisoner should be informed of and invited to take part in the safety reviews of vulnerable prisoners - ACCTs. Of all the people involved, the family knows the prisoner best and care about him or her the most.

The family of Dean Saunders told us that far from being given the chance to contribute to the reviews of the measures to keep him safe, it wasn't until the inquest that they actually found out that in the two and a half weeks he'd been in prison there had been 8 reviews - conducted by staff who didn't know Dean or anything about him.  

  • Next, a legal obligation to ensure all young offenders and suicidal prisoners should be able to call a specified and approved member of their family.  
     
    One of the most frightening things for a prisoner who's suffering the misery and fear of mental illness is being out of touch with their family.  A desperate, confused and terrified mentally ill prisoner can't stand on a wing queuing for a phone, can't find their way through pin numbers, or get permission.   Phone technology is perfectly advanced enough now for there to be a system for suicidal prisoners to be able to call home.

  • Next, where a prisoner needs to be transferred to a mental hospital, there should be a legal maximum time limit between the diagnosis and the transfer. 

    If a prisoner is regarded as so ill that they can't stay in prison and need to be moved to a secure hospital then that must happen right away. Under Mental Health Act Guidance, that's supposed to be no more than 14 days but it often takes many months. That maximum time limit should be laid down in law.

If the Minister says these 6 things are too detailed and specific for law, I would say look at the law that applies to education, look at the law that applies to health.  You'll find there legal provision for maximum staff/child ratios, legal time limits for referrals for health treatment.  If it's good enough for the education and the health service, why not for our prisons.

If the Minister says that these issues don't need to be in law, or they can be or already are in guidance, I say we've done that over and over again and it hasn't worked.  Now, it’s time it must be put into law. 

If the Minister says that these issues are more suitable for Regulations than being on the face of the Bill - I'm sure I'd have no objection to that.  Whether they are in primary or secondary legislation, is not what matters. What matters is that they should be put into law.

And I know exactly what his civil servants will say when he goes back to his department. They'll say it is unnecessary or they'll say it can't be done.  But I would ask him most sincerely to reflect on this point.  Being a Prison Minister is a great responsibility and a great privilege.  And I know he's committed to his ministerial role so I hope that he'll resist the voices which will urge him to do no more than preside over this wretched status quo.  And I ask the House to help the Minister do what needs to be done by putting these proposed New Clauses into the Bill. 

Nothing will bring back Dean Saunders and Diane Waplington, whose heartbroken families gave evidence to our Committee, or any of the other 12 women and 107 men who killed themselves in our prisons last year alone.

But we in this House, and the Minister, have a chance to make this Bill the turning point where we stop talking about the problems which are costing lives and take action. As Prison Minister, he, more than many other ministers, has an opportunity to make a difference and to save lives.  I hope he will seize that chance.  And we must make sure that he does.

 

New laws needed to tackle soaring prison suicides

As prison officers are cut, prison suicides soar. Today I spoke in the Second Reading of the Prison and Courts Bill in the House of Commons to call for a...

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February/March Monthly Report

Read more

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Along with Mrs Anita Asumadu, Head teacher of Oliver Goldsmith Primary School, Councillor Mark Williams and Councillor Johnson Situ I met with pupils and parents this morning to tell them about the detrimental impact the Government’s New National Funding Formula will have on their children.

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It is expected that pupils in Southwark will lose out approximately £1,024 each and this figure increases to £1,103 for pupils at Oliver Goldsmith Primary School.  Many parents expressed concern that their children will be worse off due to these government funding cuts.

Oliver Goldsmith Primary School - Fair funding for schools campaign

Along with Mrs Anita Asumadu, Head teacher of Oliver Goldsmith Primary School, Councillor Mark Williams and Councillor Johnson Situ I met with pupils and parents this morning to tell them...

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